It’s a Wonderful World (1939)

The last couple of months have seen us screening quite serious classics that didn’t really have many laughs … well, none actually. So it seems about time we took up a request that someone made last month for a Claudette Colbert movie (see a summary of her career below). Colbert was a versatile star in…

Paisà (1945)

NOTE: Paisà or paisàn (pai-zahn) is an American Italian slang word, meaning “buddy” or “compatriot”. Nominated for both the Academy Award for Best Writing (Original Screenplay) and the BAFTA Award for Best Film from any source, Paisà/Paisan was the most popular Italian film at the box office in 1945-46 – though not in Italy (for reasons that may become…

Rashomon (1950)

  Winning a Golden Globe for director Akira Kurosawa at the 1951 Venice Film Festival, Rashomon (1950) was awarded an Honorary Oscar in 1952 and has come to be considered a classic of world cinema. It also marks the emergence of its director (Akira Kurosawa, 1910-1998) onto the world stage and thus won Japanese cinema an…

Larceny Inc. (1942)

Providing a little Christmas hi-jinks this year for Classic Film Club is a troop of Hollywood actors who here, during WWII create laughs by spoofing the types they were more well-known for playing on screen. When we think comedy, we seldom think Edward G. Robinson, whose rise to fame came through playing tough-guy gangsters in…

Vertigo (1958)

Widely touted as Hitchcock’s most personal film – and even by some as the best film ever made – November’s film screening is a curious anomaly in the Hitchcock canon. Significantly, when Kim Novak first read the script, she understood it to be a comment on what Hollywood had done, was doing (and continued to do)…

Bigger Than Life (1956)

This month’s screening is another Nicholas Ray film from the 1950s, when both he and the film’s star, James Mason, were at their peak. Also starring Barbara Rush and Walter Matthau, Bigger Than Life is an important colour film that was shot in cinemascope. In films like Rebel Without a Cause (1955) and The True Story of Jesse James (1957),…

Somewhere in the Night (1946)

Possibly the most influential genre of American film was not really American at all. Initially it was a cheap, stylistic import that benefited from the factory system operated by Hollywood studios. Moreover, a film noir, as it came to be known, does not have to be totally realistic to become a classic. All it needs are the…