The Bad and the Beautiful (1952)

This is a movie about the movie business and the not so nice people who make movies. But as the main character says, “Don’t worry. Some of the best movies are made by people working together who hate each other’s guts.”             Like Citizen Kane (1941), this film tells its…

Gentleman’s Agreement (1947)

Many filmmakers returning from WWII were convinced it was time for Hollywood to grow up and start telling adult stories about the real world at last. Some award-winning pictures followed: The Lost Weekend (1945) dealt with alcoholism and won a Best Picture Oscar; in 1946 that award went to The Best Years of Our Lives,…

Last Holiday (1950)

The June screening for Classic Film Club at SouthBank is an Ealing comedy that offered Alec Guinness his first leading role in a film (rather than a support as he had played thus far). As was the practice at Ealing, its comedy doesn’t come with pratfalls or silly antics but with dark, ironicor even philosophical…

At Four in the Morning (1963)

Our next screening is of a film¬† kindly provided by the director’s son, Jonathan Simmons, a frequent visitor to Classic Film Club. The first film scored by John Barry (who also composed the Bond theme, of course), At Four in the Morning (1963) was given an ‘X’ rating by the BBFC for it’s adult content…

Roman Holiday (1953)

Included in 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die (Schneider ed., 2003) and ranked no.4 on the American Film Institute’s list of the 10 greatest romantic comedies, Roman Holiday (1953) introduced Audrey Hepburn in her first major role and received 15 nominations for different awards, winning 10, included 3 Oscars – one of which…

Key Largo (1948)

A Humphrey Bogart Film Festival is held every year on the tropical island of Key Largo within easy reach of several airports and an easy drive from some of Florida’s most popular destinations. Which means it is now less demanding to get there than it was for Frank McCloud, Bogart’s character who¬†arrives by boat at…

Follow the Fleet (1936)

February 21st, 1936. The New York Times: “With Irving Berlin’s score as a rhythmic accompaniment and with a considerably altered edition of Hubert Osborne’s play, “Shore Leave” (1922), as a convenient excuse, “Follow the Fleet” reduces itself, and quite pleasantly, to a generous series of attractive song and dance numbers linked almost imperceptibly by the…